Acacia dealbata

Acacia dealbata_silver wattle_JM DiTomaso
Photo courtesy Joseph DiTomaso

Synonyms: Acacia decurrens var. dealbata

Common names: silver wattle

Acacia dealbata (silver wattle) is a tree (family Fabaceae) found in the coastal ranges, San Francisco Bay area, and south coast of California. It favors disturbed places in coastal prairies, riparian areas and coniferous forests. Silver wattle is often confused with green wattle (Acacia decurrens), but is distinguishable by the small, silvery hairs that grow on its twigs. It spreads via rhizomes and seeds, and easily resprouts after being cut. Acacia dealbata changes soil chemistry by fixing nitrogen, and the plants’ fallen leaves may have allelopathic effects that prevent the growth of native understory plants. Like many acacias, silver wattle is commonly planted as an ornamental.

Cal-IPC Rating: Moderate

Cal-IPC Assessment

Plant Assessment Form - Information gathered by Cal-IPC on the impacts, rate of spread, and distribution of invasive plants in California. Does not include management information.

Weed RIC Management Notes

No Weed RIC Management Notes are available for this species. Check for information on other species in the genus on the Weed RIC site.

Cal-IPC Newsletter Articles

There are no newsletter articles associated with this species yet.

Cal-IPC Symposium Presentations

  • Horowitz, M. (2003). Alternatives to chemical stump treatment of Acacia dealbata. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2003. Kings Beach, CA.

Other Acacia dealbata Information

  • CalPhotos - Images of plants taken mostly in California.
  • Calflora - See the distribution of this species on Calflora's map of California.
  • CalWeedMapper - Distribution information with ability to determine regional priorities.
  • Jepson Online Interchange for California Flora - Information on taxonomy, biology, and distribution from UC Berkeley's Jepson Herbarium.
  • USDA PLANTS Database - Federal database with information on identification and distribution, and links to websites in individual states.