Brassica nigra

Photo by Ron Vanderhoff

Synonyms: Sinapis nigra (L.)

Common names: black mustard

Brassica nigra (black mustard) is a winter annual herb/forb (family Brassicaceae). Like other mustards, black mustard grows profusely and produces allelopathic chemicals that prevent germination of native plants. The spread of black mustard can increase the frequency of fires in chaparral and coastal sage scrub, changing these habitats to annual grassland.

Rating: Moderate

Cal-IPC Resources

  • Plant Assessment Form - Information gathered by Cal-IPC on the impacts, rate of spread, and distribution of invasive plants in California. Does not include management information.
  • CalWeedMapper - Statewide maps, climate models, and reports.
  • Cal-IPC News - Our quarterly newsletter. Each issue is available as a pdf.
  • Cal-IPC Symposium Proceedings - Presentations and papers from our annual Symposium.
  • Don't Plant a Pest! - Select your region to find non-invasive alternatives to ornamental species. Also see our statewide brochure on trees.

Other Resources

Symposium Presentations

  • Tuttle, E., K. Johnston, et al. (2011). Evaluating distribution and prevalence of non-native vegetation percent cover in a Southern California wetland and its application to inform habitat restoration and non-native vegetation control. Cal-IPC 2011 Symposium. Tahoe City, CA, California Invasive Plant Council.
  • Betts, S., R. Dahlquist, et al. (2010). Developing time/temperature inactivation models for thermal death of black mustard (Brassica nigra) seeds. Cal-IPC 2010 Symposium. Ventura, CA, California Invasive Plant Council.
  • Olesen, C., D. Doran, et al. (2009). Evaluating the seed bank of a disturbed site to determine potential ecological restoration strategies. Cal-IPC Symposium 2009. Visalia, CA, California Invasive Plant Council.
  • Codianne, J. and L. Dumont (2007). Coyote Creek floodplain reclamation project: Re-establishing native plant habitat. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2007. San Diego, CA, California Invasive Plant Council.
  • Lair, K., N. Ritter, et al. (2006). Restoration of retired San Joaquin Valley farmlands using herbicides and activated charcoal. Cal-IPC Symposium. Rohnert Park, CA.
  • Marushia, R. and J. Holt (2005). Phenology of Brassica tournefortii in comparison to B. nigra, B. geniculata, and native Mojave Desert annuals. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2005. Chico, CA.
  • Dickerson, E., C. Brigham, et al. (2004). Ecohelpers: Education and ecological restoration in Southern California. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2004. Ventura, CA.
  • Keeley, J. E. (2004). Fire management impacts on invasive species at the wildland/urban interface in California. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2004. Ventura, CA.
  • White, V. A. and J. S. Holt (2002). Effect of competition on artichoke thistle, Cynara cardunculus. California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium 2002. Sacramento, CA.
  • Burrascano, C. (2001). Review of the impact of invasive weeds on two endangered plant species: Acanthomintha ilicifolia (San Diego thornmint) and Monardella linoides ssp. viminea (willowly monardella). California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium 2001. San Diego, CA.
  • St.John, T. (1998). Nitrate immobilization and the mycorrhizal network for control of exotic ruderals. California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium '98. Ontario, CA.
  • Archbald, G. (1998). Mechanical control methods: beyond weed bashing. California Exotic Pest Plant Council Symposium '98. Ontario, CA.
  • Minnich, R. A. (1994). Effects of exotic plants on three California ecosystems. California Exotic Pest Plant Symposium '94. Sacramento, CA.

Cal-IPC News Articles

  • Holt, J. S. (2005). Invasive plants research at UC Riverside. Cal-IPC News. 13: 12-13.
  • Kelly, M. (2000). Education: Wildland weed tours and talks. CalEPPC News. 8: 3-4.
  • Perala, C., D. A. Hoover, et al. (1993). Control of exotic plants in an herbaceous understory. CalEPPC News. 1: 4-6.